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Communicating the complexity: a film on how science speaks to society

We live in the information age but knowing what to believe and who to trust is harder than ever. What has this done for the public perception of science?

Can we trust ourselves when it comes to gene editing?

Genetic editing could be one of our most powerful tools to treat illness and suffering, but could it change what it means to be human?

Could advanced microbes really replace synthetic fertilizer?

The emergence of synthetic biology offers the potential to engineer microbes to help us grow crops without the need for artificial fertilizer.

Molecular mind-set: How we are completely rethinking cancer

Oncologists are increasingly understanding the genomic drivers behind cancers, leading to a host of promising new treatments.

Finding a cure for cancer – is big data the solution?

The explosion in patient data has the potential to revolutionize how we treat cancer – but the big data solution still faces huge logistical challenges.

Four innovations changing the lives of farm animals for the better

Maintaining the health and well-being of farm animals is hugely important. Technology is increasingly playing a central role in supporting that.

Can Cell Therapy Beat the Most Difficult Diseases?

There are some 7,000 intractable diseases with no known treatment, but medicine hasn’t given up, and in an effort to treat intractable diseases we are turning to the very building blocks of our bodies.

Feeding ten billion: how can we farm our unfarmable land?

A quarter-pounder hamburger is meat, wheat, and veg—but it’s mostly meat. Americans eat more meat than anyone else on the planet, but meat is an inefficient food source.

How Can Big Data Beat Big Disease?

Predicting outbreaks of a disease, from the passage of the Zika virus to a person’s predisposition to cancer, is crucial to our ability to fight back—and big data is at the front of that battle.

Genomics: A revolution in health care?

Drugs affect people differently and we’re increasingly understanding why. For many of us, it’s down to our genes.


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